Sunday, June 21, 2020

Humboldt Redwood Company to log amongst old growth trees and a spotted owl nest tree inside unit 2 near Stafford, CA.


Image by nationalgeographic.org
THP 1-20-087 HUM (Green Bear THP) Humboldt Redwood Company, 216.2 acres; 37% selection, 32% group selection, 21% no-harvest, special 9%, 1% roadside logging. Bear Creek (HUM: T1N R1E Sec 25; T1N R2E Sec 30).  Winter operations, moderate erosion hazard, steep slopes over 65%, landslide terrain, impaired 303.d watershed, 41 road drainage work sites, scattered old growth trees inside units 2 and 3, herbicides, coho watershed, spotted owl, marbled murrelet, osprey, trees up to 44” dbh.  Estimated public comment deadline: 07/11/20. SUBMIT COMMENTS, VIEW THP, THP PLAN

This THP is about 5 miles SE of Scotia, CA, and about 1.5 miles SE of Stafford, CA by Humboldt Redwoods State Park and Highway 101 at an elevation of 120 to 750 feet.  Humboldt Redwood Company is planning an individual tree selection and group selection tractor and cable logging operation in redwood, Douglas fir and grand fir forests.  The THP area flows into the Eel River which is listed as an impaired watershed for sediment and temperature. There are 13 landslide terrain sites in the THP area including; 1 unstable area in unit 1, 6 unstable areas in unit 2, 1 unstable area in unit 3, and 5 unstable areas in unit 4. Scattered residual old growth trees exist inside units 2 and 3. Humboldt Redwood Company is planning to use ground based equipment in areas designated for cable logging, use 2 existing skid trails inside class II (mid sized) watercourse areas and use ground based equipment on steep slopes exceeding 65% in unit 4. 41 road drainage sites are planned for work including rocking, dip construction, ditch cleaning, culvert repair/replacement, waterhole construction and restoration of washed out crossings. There is a marbled murrelet stand (Cooper Mill) within .25 miles of the THP area on the opposite side of Highway 101, and osprey were reported within 500 feet of the THP area. Seven spotted owl nesting territories are located within 1.3 miles of the THP area, including a spotted owl nest tree inside unit 2.

5 comments:

  1. I oppose logging amongst old grove forests. They cannot be replaced in our lifetime once logged. It will take centuries. RESPECT nature. We all part of it.

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  2. This must be stopped!! Deforestation is one of the greatest causes of climate change on earth. There are dozens of alternatives to lumber. When will we stop putting short term profit ahead of long term survival? Humans are animals and part of an ecosystem. You can't expect to destroy one part of the ecosystem and have the rest of the beings on earth continue to survive. Someone needs to stop this!!

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  3. Enough! The destruction of nature for short term gain has lead us to the brink of an environmental collapse. And the destruction of such beauty destroys our humanity. Such trends must end.

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  4. Working for forestry consultants NRM in the 1990's, I produced Cumulative Watershed Effects Assessments and designed Watercourse Protection Zones on ARCO/Simpson's last old-growth THP's. Biological resources were half-ass protected but watershed protections were somewhat reasonable. The description of this THP presents several red flags to me. The worst things I see are operating heavy equipment in Class II WPZ's and on steep slopes, winter operations, and use of herbicides. If the value of harvested timber doesn't cover better watershed protections, the trees should be left alone.

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  5. I also oppose the cutting of old growth forests.The habitat, heritage and beauty they provide surpasses any short term gain of lumber.

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